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Posts Tagged ‘racing industry

Guinness is Good For. . . Horses

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We all know Guinness is good for you. That’s been the ad slogan since 1929, and it turns out a lot of horsemen extend that slogan straight into the shedrow.

The dark Irish stout has long been a traditional feed additive for Irish horse trainers – and their proteges of all nationalities. Trainer Derek Ryan, originally of County Tipperary, Ireland, told the New York Times that Musket Man, then a Derby Hopeful, “gets one can every day. It helps his appetite. He’s not a finicky eater, but it does him good. The food is their fuel and if they’re not eating well you are in trouble.”

Musket Man followed through for Ryan’s conditioning program with a third-place finish in the Derby, a third in the Preakness (to Rachel Alexandra and Mine That Bird, so a pretty honest placing), then made his 2010 comeback in a big way at the Super Stakes (Tampa), and, presumably still on a diet of Guinness, worked 4 furlongs in 46.8 on March 27th. Proving that a pint a day does indeed do you good.

Zenyatta - well her father is Irish, anyway.

He’s not the only horse to like his beer dark. How about Zenyatta, being poured a pint by trainer John Shirreffs? The incomparable Irish-bred steeplechaser Arkle famously had two pints daily to soak his oats.

What could the health benefits truly be? While Ryan cites the yeast as a key appetite stimulant, there are other nutrients in the stout: “Guinness also contains small quantities of iron, calcium, phosphates, some vitamins (including vitamin B) and fiber, according to Guinness Master Brewer, Fergal Murray.” (source:vx50.com)

Besides spurring racehorses on to victory, Guinness is also put to use in show barns around the country for anhydrosis, or non-sweating, which has left so many horses shut in box stalls, with multiple fans blowing on them, because they’ve lost the ability to sweat. A pint of Guinness a day, often in addition to the supplement One-AC, is the most common treatment – even if the vets shake their heads.

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Written by Natalie Keller Reinert

March 30, 2010 at 12:25 am

From Aqueduct to Albany

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There is news today that perhaps the horsemen have been heard, as the Thoroughbred Times reports that legislation has been introduced in New York to facilitate a transparent new process for approving a racino operator at Aqueduct.

It wasn't the cover. But it was something.

This is just days after the so-called Big A-6 managed to cancel the first race at Aqueduct, boycotting with their six entries, and brought together the racing community at neighboring Belmont for a rally calling upon Albany to stop stalling and give the horsemen what they had been promised: a racino, the chance at renewed purses and breeders’ incentives, the knowledge that the business was not bankrupt and the Thoroughbreds could go on running.

The latest twist in the long plot of the Video Lottery Terminals (VLT) that have been coming to an Aqueduct near you for nine years… and just why do the words Video Lottery Terminals seem so magical to members of the racing industry?

Because they’ve worked before.

As Jay Hovdey points out in his blog at the Daily Racing Form (may require free reg.), the racino is not the silver bullet, and in some locations, the hugely successful casinos are trying to shoulder out the horses or dogs that brought them there in the first place. But they are a start. And with the example of New York’s Standardbred industry –  racetracks like Yonkers offering gaming to those looking for quicker pay-outs than what they’d receive from studying the past performances, the track conditions, and the Beyer figures, not to mention the many successful Thoroughbred tracks in the country, from Delaware to Mountaineer Park – the way to saving New York Thoroughbred racing seems clear enough.

And by and large, governments are turning to VLTs and racinos to save themselves from the huge budget shortfalls of the Great Recession. Just today, the New Hampshire Senate passed a bill allowing video lottery in six locations – including three racetracks – with the goal of earning enough to restore cut social services.

The possibility of not just saving the horsemen and the communities around them, but actually making back the money necessary to close New York’s budget gap, rescue NYRA’s signature tracks and races (the Belmont Stakes among them), and creating hundreds of additional jobs in New York City, ought to be too much for the legislators in Albany to turn down. If they can just stand to do something without giving all the deals to their friends, as in the case of the Aqueduct Entertainment Group.

Sen. Marty Golden, (R-Brooklyn) has proposed an open plan to allow an accounting firm to review bids and make a recommendation, and requires the state to review the recommendation publicly within ten days, making a final decision within fifteen days of the public hearing.

Yes, that’s allowing 25 days, assuming the legislation gets through, and bids are made in a timely manner. Fairly speedy, for government. Especially a government that has spent nine years doing – what, exactly? Nine years, nine foal crops, nine summers at Saratoga, a generation of children from kindergarten to high school – nine years of uncertainty for thousands of people in and around the racing business.

New York Racing’s Rally for Jobs – And Community

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The rally at Belmont Park on Sunday afternoon wasn’t about horses. It wasn’t about gambling. It wasn’t about fair labor, or working conditions, or any of the usual suspects that incite workers’ rallies.

It was about the continued survival of a community.

Tens of thousands jobs are on the line, and as New  Jersey’s forward-thinking purse initiatives move to make the same sports thefts that have taken New York sports franchises in the past, Albany continues to refuse to make good upon a nine-year-old promise to assign an operator for the much-maligned, sadly hypothetical racino at Aqueduct.

The crowd gathered on the brick apron of Belmont Park, near the finish line of the third leg of the Triple Crown, was as diverse a group as any random population on a crowded city street. It was the eclectic mix that sums up racing life – all classes, clothing, countries. . . hotwalkers, grooms, riders, trainers, breeders. Urban and rural groups together, asking the government for the same thing – and shouldn’t have that made the decision easy? So why has the Aqueduct racino dragged on for nearly a decade, with no end in sight?

There were children in strollers, playing in the grass, bouncing balloons. There were well-dressed owners and trainers with their families. There were state legislators, community leaders, and racing association directors. Many of these people would only have come together because of the incredible diversity of the Thoroughbred industry. They represent in their diversity the many communities that they support.

As the Long Island Railroad trains rattled by beyond the backstretch and the airplanes slowly slid over on their approach to JFK, Matthew Veitch, county supervisor from Saratoga, reminded the crowd that the VLT issues were not strictly an urban, racing plant problem, “not an upstate, downstate problem,” but a whole state issue. Even as letting New York racing fade costs the state millions of dollars, he pointed out, it causes racing to lose both the purses and prestige that have made New York the horseman’s choice for a century and a half.

It also means that upstate, New York’s richest agribusiness is flailing. Joe McMahon (McMahon of Saratoga), spoke of mares bred declining by more than half. Yes, this means few New York-breds competing in three years. It also means that only half of the jobs in the breeding industry and the communities surrounding them will be available in the coming years. Diminished breeding means out of work grooms, blacksmiths, veterinarians, feed dealers, trainers, watchmen. Out-of-work people mean grocers, dry cleaners, restauranteurs, doctors, plumbers get less business. Children eat less, even go hungry. They fail at school. They drop out before they graduate. Generations slip under. When industries are allowed to fail, communities fail.

How many communities will fail if the Thoroughbred industry, from the upstate farms and the brief summers of hospitality at Saratoga, to New York City’s cast of thousands who support the city tracks, to the tens of thousands who depend on these workers’ patronage – how many communities will simply collapse?

All for want of a simple solution that was already promised to the horsemen and workers of New York? A relatively simple system, the development of a racino at a free-standing structure, complete with public transportation, in the nation’s most densely populated urban corridor – they managed it in Louisiana. It is shocking that they can’t manage something so basic in New York.

Rick Violette, president of the New York Thoroughbred Horsemens’ Association, expressed the fear and frustration of the communities at risk best with his one simple solution: to put the governor and the parties responsible for selecting a VLT in a locked room and to not let them out until a deal has been agreed upon.

The theme of the day was community. The chant of the day was “Real people, real jobs.” The mood of the day was frustration, with an undercurrent of worry, even fear. Real lives, entire communities at stake. And nothing for it but to stand together in one place, and shout, and hope that someone in charge is listening. It isn’t a bad practice; revolutions have been started and been won this way for centuries. The only question is, how many will shout, how loudly, and will it be soon enough to save New York’s racing community and heritage?